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Miguel Rio BrancoPrevious | Next
Quote of the Week
A good image is created by a state of grace. Grace expresses itself when it has been freed from conventions, free like a child in his early discovery of reality. The game is then to organize the rectangle.
Sergio Larrain
Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2006
Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2006
Yves Saint Laurent turns 70
Monday, Jul. 31, 2006
Magical Marrakech
Friday, Jul. 28, 2006
Cityscapes: Rio de Janeiro
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© Martine Franck / Magnum Photos

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(c) Miguel Rio Branco / Magnum Photos
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil—A boxer, 1993.
© Miguel Rio Branco / Magnum Photos
Interactive Essays
No Whisper No SighTour de France
No Whisper No Sigh
by Magnum Photographers

No Whisper No Sigh is an introspective photo essay built around the concept of silence—from the societal silence surrounding madness; to the political silence forced on citizens living under a dictatorship; to that most personal silence, the intense desire to express oneself and unburden the soul. Music composed specially by a Finnish collective.

Tour de France
Comments by Joergen Leth

The legends, the landscape, the stars, the coveted yellow jersey. These are the ingredients that make the Tour de France the biggest event in cycling. Magnum Photos has followed the race, the riders and the spectators for more than 60 years, providing a unique portrait of the Tour.

Magnum in Motion Video Podcasts
book
Book of the Week: <i>The Bikeriders</i>
Book of the Week: The Bikeriders
by Danny Lyon
In 1965, 23-year-old photographer Danny Lyon, a veteran of the civil rights movement, returned to his hometown, Chicago, and joined the Outlaw Motorcycle Club. Riding with camera in tow, he produced these raw and dramatic photos, which were released in 1968, a year before Easy Rider, and again in 2003. The Bikeriders imprinted on the public a vision of the heyday of life in a motorcycle gang.
focus
Zoom In: Hiroshima Remembered
Zoom In: Hiroshima Remembered
by Magnum Photographers
On Aug. 6, 1945, the United States dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima. According to U.S. statistics, 60,000 to 70,000 people were immediately killed, and two-thirds of the city was destroyed. Three days later, another atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, which killed between 35,000 and 40,000 people. The effects of the nuclear attacks lasted long after the end of the war.

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